Re-Learning Clojure. Part two: High octane action

Re-Learning Clojure is a blog series of my adventures through Clojure for te Brave and True. In this series I’m trying to re-learn clojure and deepen my skills in the language. Putting it all together Link Let’s get straight into the action, continuing from where we left off. After fighting a bit with some Vim autocommands, I got auto-pairs working. With Clojure I feel it’s beneficial to have the brackets close themselves by default.
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Re-Learning Clojure. Part one: Getting my feet wet

After following my friend Juhis’s series on learning rust, I decided I should pick up Clojure again. And while I’m at it, I want to revitalize my blog writing, so here we are: Two stones with one bird. I first learned Clojure in 2018 while working for my previous employer and I really enjoyed my time with! However work took me towards another path; developing Java applications with some Javascript, and then moving to working more with Javascript.
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Writing JavaScript, but with types!

As someone who has worked with strongly typed languages like Java and C# and loosely typed languages like JavaScript, I’ve often run into a situtation in which I’ve wished my JavaScript code would have types and they would be enforced. This would save me from a lot of runtime headache that can happen for example when a string variable is passed into a function expecting a number. The result is the dreaded situation every js developer has run into at some point of their carreer
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Getting Hooked on Stoxy

Stoxy is a modern state management library built around creating reactive, stateful and persistent web experiences. Stoxy allows you to easily control the global state of your application, and tap into said state when needed. The newest addition to Stoxy is a new add-on library: Stoxy Hooks. Stoxy Hooks are a easy way to integrate Stoxy to any React or Preact application. Examples Here I’ll show a few simple examples of Stoxy Hooks in action
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Creating a Offline First Stock Price Tracker With Stoxy

At the start of this week, I released my state management library, Stoxy to the wild. After gaining some tracktion from different outlets, I decided I should create a small demo project showcasing the best parts about using Stoxy. That’s why I decided to create a small Offline-first application for tracking stock prices. It will be built with Web Components and utilize the Stoxy library for handling the state, online and offline.
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Utilizing Simplr Router

I started working on Simplr Router in September 2019. Back then I had just learned about Web Components and the power they enable for developers. We were working on our first bigger project and were using LitElement. We had great tooling, but were missing one thing: A router which suited our needs and customizability. That’s when I started working on Simplr Router. The Dream From the beginning, I have wanted to keep Simplr Router at 0 dependecies, and so far we’ve been able to keep it that way.
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Comparing React and Web Components. Part 2: Components

This is part 2 of my series comparing Web Components and React. You can find the first part here Before we get started, I’ll clear out some possible misconceptions from the last post: OpenWC is not LitElement. LitElement is a Open source library written by the Polymer team and the open source contributors while OpenWC is a community aimed at providing recommendations for web component development. LitElement is a base class that makes use of the lit-html library.
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Comparing React and Web Components. Part 1: Starters

I’ve always shunned away from big frameworks while working with Javascript. I used to work with React, but after gaining more experience with the language, I’ve started to go closer to vanilla with everything I do. Comparing starter scripts I ran the recommended starters for both React and Lit Element, one of the most used Web Component libraries. For React, the started included 262 mb of depndencies just to get started
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Porting Libraries to Web Components

As Web Components become a part of the Web Standard, more libraries are being created with Web Components instead of just exposing the API of said library. But what about the libraries created before the rise of Web Components? Can they be ported into Web Components, and what kind of a workload would this be? This is what we’ll be discussing today. Preface So why would we want to create a Web Component equivalent of a library if there already is an existing implementation?
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How I Stopped Being Scared and Started Loving Vim

Vim. It’s the editor in the center of all freshman Computer Science student memes. It’s something almost every developer has seen at some part of their career. The most usual first touch to Vim is when new developers start using Git from the command line, and there is a merge conflict, or you forget to type a commit message. Oh no what is this how do I escape <esc> <esc> <CTRL-C>
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